Picking the Right Brand Colors for Your Audience

Picking the Right Brand Colors for Your Audience

Hey guys, it’s your girl Adrian M White aka Brand with AMW and I’m here today for another weekly Brand & Convert Chat and Chew. This is your chance to take a quick snack or lunch break and learn about all things branding, marketing, and entrepreneurship. Get your notebooks out because I have some juicy content to share.

Follow me @brandwithamw on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and join our private Facebook Community, Brand & Convert with Adrian M White for more conversation on developing brands, websites, and processes that attract and convert more clients and grow six-figure businesses. Link in the description.

Are you currently promoting yourself online to in turn promote your business? Put yourself out there and make a statement to your followers by copping your exclusive ‘I Am My Brand’ swag. T-shirts are available in black and white with male and female sizing, available in sizes S-2X for $25 each. Get yours today at brandwithamw.com/shop.

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Research shows that up to 85% of consumers believe color is the biggest motivator when choosing a particular product, while 92% acknowledge visual appearance as the most persuasive marketing factor overall. Colors elicit emotions and feelings, which enables customers to form an initial impression without even knowing what your product is about. Put simply, brand colors are powerful in helping customers decide whether they want to engage.

And that’s our discussion for today, “Picking the Right Brand Colors for your Audience.”

Color psychology is the study of how colors affect perceptions and behaviors. It allows us to understand color and use it to our advantage, especially when it comes to marketing and branding.

Let’s think of some popular examples and their color schemes:

  • McDonald’s – There’s a science behind McDonald’s key colors. Red is stimulating, increasing the heart rate, and as a result, your appetite. Yellow is associated with being happy, plus it’s the most visible color to spot from a distance.
  • Google – Google chose red, blue, and yellow because they are the primary colors, but they added green to show they don’t always follow the rules. This childlike palette makes technology seem less intimidating—appropriate for a company that prides itself on making things really easy to use.

Here’s the meaning of colors:

Red is associated with danger, excitement, and energy. It’s also known for being the color of love and passion.

Pink is feminine, it’s sentimental and romantic. Different shades, like hot pink, can be youthful and bold.

Orange, like its namesake, is fresh and full of vitality. It’s also creative, adventurous, and associated with being cost-effective.

Yellow is optimistic. It’s a color associated with being playful and happy.

Green is natural, and often used to demonstrate sustainability. But it can also align with prestige and wealth.

Blue is trustworthy and reliable. It’s calming or often associated with depression.

Purple is royalty and majesty. It can be spiritual and mysterious.

Brown is down-to-earth and honest, often used for organic wholesome products.

White is pure. It conveys simplicity and innocence, often with a minimalistic feel.

Black is both sophisticated and elegant. It can be formal and luxurious, but also sorrowful.

Multicolor is united or open to anything. It’s great for capturing the spirit of diversity

When determining your color scheme, first, identify what your brand is about, as having a clear idea—what your brand’s goals are and how you want your target audience to feel—will help hone the best colors to choose for your brand.

Think about your brand in the following ways:

Brand goals: Do you want customers to be happy, to get rich, or be more informed?

Target audience: Do you want them to feel positive, confident, or intelligent?

Personality traits: Is your brand fun, serious, or inspirational?

The way you want to be perceived by customers can help further narrow down your color scheme. So while your product might be organic—a color typically associated with brown—your brand essence might be about celebrating the goodness, in which case you may choose to go with optimistic yellow. Even better, you could feature both brown and yellow to be part of your brand color palette.

If you need help determining your brand colors and developing your logo, feel free to book a complimentary brand strategy session with me at uniquebrandsthatconvert.com.

Comment below with any questions and join me this Friday at 1 PM EST in our private Facebook Community for Friday Lives. This is where you can participate in a live discussion on this week’s topic and Q&A. Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram at Brandwithamw for more entrepreneur advice and a look into my everyday life.

Wishing you much success and good juju.

How to Create a Brand Style Guide

How to Create a Brand Style Guide

Hey guys, it’s your girl Adrian M White aka Brand with AMW and I’m here today for another weekly Brand & Convert Chat and Chew. This is your chance to take a quick snack or lunch break and learn about all things branding and web design with a marketing spin. Get your notebooks out because I have some juicy content to share today.

Follow me @brandwithamw on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and if you’re a female entrepreneur join our private Facebook Community, Brand & Convert with Adrian M White for more conversation on how to grow a six-figure business. Link in the description box.

Make sure you Subscribe to the channel and turn on notifications for new videos and of course show some love by liking and commenting on the video.

When you are browsing Instagram have you ever noticed that some of your favorite influencers have the same filters on every photo, have specific colors they use, and even fonts? They are following specific brand standard guidelines that were defined in a Brand Style Guide and that’s what you should be doing too, specifically on social media, email, and your website. Today I’ll be sharing with you How to create a Brand Style Guide.

A brand style guide takes the heart and soul of your brand—your mission, vision, and values—and translates it into the design. It also tells everyone exactly how to communicate your brand.

It is a rulebook that explains how a company or personal brand presents itself to the world through its logo, font and color selections, photography, and much more. Put another way, it’s a reference tool that helps maintain consistency in what a brand looks, feels, and sounds like.

Why are brand guidelines important?

Think of your brand identity as your company’s personality. It’s how the world recognizes you and begins to trust you. If you see someone change how they look and act all the time, you won’t feel like you know who they are, and you certainly wouldn’t trust them.

Imagine a co-worker who always wears a dress shirt tucked into slacks, with his hair cut neatly short. Now imagine if that same person walked into work one day unshaven, wearing cutoff jeans and sporting a new tattoo of a tiger riding a motorcycle through flames. It’d probably feel uncomfortable because it’s not what you’re used to. You might even check in with him to make sure everything was okay.

The same logic applies to brands: inconsistency will confuse and alienate your customers. A style guide is important because it helps your business communicate in a consistent way across all teams and channels.

Key Components of a Brand Identity

1. Mission – why your company exists
2. Vision – where you want your company to go
3. Target Audience – who are your customers and why do they need you
4. Brand Personality – make a list of 3-5 adjectives to describe your brand
5. Core Values – Determine the guiding principles for company decisions and actions

How to create a brand style guide

1. Find a template
2. Establish your logo
3. Establish your brand color scheme
4. Establish typography and font guidelines
5. Find photo inspiration
6. Input into your template

That’s it for today, I hope you found this information helpful. Comment below with any questions and don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at Brandwithamw for more entrepreneur advice and a look into my everyday life.

Wishing you much success and good juju.

Personal Brands vs. Business Brands. Which One is Right for You?

Personal Brands vs. Business Brands. Which One is Right for You?

Hey guys, it’s your girl Adrian M White aka Brand with AMW and I’m here today for another weekly Brand & Convert Chat and Chew. This is your chance to take a quick snack or lunch break and learn about all things branding and web design with a marketing spin.

Follow me @brandwithamw on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and if you’re a female entrepreneur join our Facebook Community, Brand & Convert with Adrian M White for more conversation on how to grow a six-figure business. Link in the description box.

Make sure you Subscribe to the channel and turn on notifications for new videos and of course show some love by liking and commenting on the video.

So today we are talking about personal brands vs business brands.

As an entrepreneur, when you start your business, it can get confusing on if you should brand your name or company. There’s a lot of successful people out there that have built their following using their name, for example, Iyanla Vanzant, Oprah, Amy Porterfield, Eric Thomas and more. Although they may have a company name that differs, you know that you can look them up and find them and their website under their first and last name.

A personal brand is built around you — your personality, your lifestyle, and your interests.

It usually means you brand your business with your name.

A business brand is built around an identity you create for your business. It usually means you need to craft a name for your business that’s independent of your personal name.

Both brands need a brand voice or personality. You can check out my other video to learn exactly what that is.

There are a lot of advantages branding yourself with your name (also known as building a personal brand) vs. your company name.

Some of them are:

1. Personal brands are flexible.
2. Personal brands are ideal if you want to develop a speaking career.
3. Personal brands are perfect for “one-person industries” also known as solopreneurs

Some of the disadvantages are:

1. Your company name won’t state what you do: you have to associate your personal name with what you offer. This can be done with a strong tagline that you use consistently in everything you do. You can also associate what you offer with your personal name by writing blog posts, doing interviews, creating social media posts, and booking speaking engagements around your area of expertise.

2. It’s hard to sell a personally-branded business.

Now a business brand can take a little more hard work on the front end because you have to come up with a creative company name but it can be worth it on the backend.

Here’s some advantages of creating a business brand

1. Creating a business brand forces you to think through your plans for your business. When it’s time to come up with a business name, you will need to think about who your ideal customer is, what you’ll offer, and what your business will be known for. Going through this process will help you create a vision for where you want to take your business that goes way beyond your business name and tagline.

2. Business brands allow you to position your business from the start. Your business name and tagline usually are descriptive and your ideal customers should have a good idea of what you do after stating it.

3. Business brands are easier to sell.

Some disadvantages are

1. It’s hard work to build a business brand. You have to create a brand name at a time when you may still be trying to decide what your business will offer, and who your ideal customer will be.

2. Business brands aren’t as flexible if your interests change. If you decide to change course and offer something completely different, you may need to start a second business if it doesn’t relate to your business name.

Is there a happy medium between a personal brand and a business brand?

I believe there is a happy medium, and it’s easier to pull off now than ever before.

Build your business brand while simultaneously work to establish your personal authority around a topic.

How? You create a business brand and then reach out to other business owners to help you spread the word about what you offer.

You write guest posts, appear in interviews, speak, and personally spread the word about your business brand.

As you answer questions and convey information, your personal authority grows along with the awareness of your business brand.

If you can’t decide between a personal or business brand, this approach may be the most flexible of all!

It can help your business triumph online because it’s a perfect blend of authority, personality, and engagement.

If you need help building your personal or business brand feel free to book a Complimentary Brand Strategy session with me at www.uniquebrandsthatconvert.com.

That’s it for today. Comment below with any questions and don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at Brandwithamw for more entrepreneur advice and a look into my everyday life.

Wishing you much success and good juju.

Finding and Defining your Brand Voice

Finding and Defining your Brand Voice

Hey guys, it’s your girl Adrian M White aka Brand with AMW and I’m here today for another weekly Brand & Convert Chat and Chew. This is your chance to take a quick snack or lunch break and learn about all things branding and web design with a marketing spin.

Follow me @brandwithamw on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and if you’re a female entrepreneur join our Facebook Community, Brand & Convert with Adrian M White for more conversation on how to grow your business. Link in the description box.

Make sure you Subscribe to the channel and turn on notifications for new videos and of course show some love by liking and commenting on the video.

Alright so let’s jump right in and talk about today’s topic, Finding and Defining your Brand Voice.

In the branding process, people often think about how a brand looks visually, from fonts to colors to design styles. But what is sometimes overlooked is brand voice. With social media, email, and your website being some of the top online marketing strategies, it’s important that your brand voice be consistent and stand out.

Even if you’re unfamiliar with the term, you have likely experienced it. Take Wendy’s for example whose Twitter has a sarcastic undertone to all of its messages. While you can get away without having a distinctive brand voice, you can take your marketing much further once you’ve established one.

So what exactly is a brand voice?

Brand voice is the distinct personality a brand takes on in its communications. Imagine you went to a dinner party and you’re chatting with all the guests. One person stands out because they’re great at storytelling in a distinctive, unique way. The flow of their words, the language they used, and their personality all combined to make for a memorable experience. In fact, when you’re retelling that story, you immediately think of that person.

Now think of that dinner guest as a brand voice. Who is your brand online? If your brand was a person, what personality traits would they take on and what would they actively avoid? What phrases and stylistic choices does your brand use on a consistent basis?

All of the above combine to create your brand voice. This personality is applied everywhere your brand speaks, including newsletters, social media posts, and internal official communications like company announcements and advertising.

Why does it matter?

Brand voices help you stand out from the crowd. When people are viewing your content they should be enjoying the experience and love what you represent. If you don’t have a brand voice or personality it’s hard to do that.

Here are 5 steps to find your brand voice

1. Know your Customers

a. Your brand voice is meant to be heard by the customers. Make sure it sounds pleasant to their ears. Know what they like, what they want, and their demographics, and create the music after some initial research.

2. It’s for you but they should like it too

a. Having a unique and differentiated brand voice that can be recognized by the customer is beneficial for the brand as long as it is liked by the customer. Your position in the market is decided by the user and hence, it’s your job to woo him.

3. Your voice should represent your personality a. Assign yourself an adjective first like adventurous, cool, friendly, flirty, etc. and build your voice based on it.

4. Don’t act like a robot

a. A company is an artificial person, not a robot. Interact with them and use vocabulary that can be understood.

5. Create a brand voice chart

a. Include three rows for each of the primary characteristics accompanied by three columns – a brief description, do’s, and don’ts. If necessary, add a row for any secondary characteristic that needs a little extra explanation. In this example, “irreverent” is a related word and should be fleshed out so the team is clear on how it is defined (i.e., Does irreverent mean to challenge the status quo or to be snarky?)

Make sure to share your brand voice if you hire anyone to help with your marketing efforts and always be consistent.

If you need help with defining your brand voice download my Brand Narrative Workbook which has multiple sections on your brand voice and personality. Link in the description.

That’s it for today. Comment below with any questions and don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram at Brandwithamw for more entrepreneur advice and a look into my everyday life.

Wishing you much success and good juju.

Building your Target Persona

Building your Target Persona

Hey guys, it’s your girl, Adrian M White aka Brand with AMW, and I’m here today for our weekly Brand & Convert Chat and Chew. This is your opportunity to take a quick snack or lunch break and learn about how to better brand and market your business.

Every Tuesday I’ll be posting a new video related to branding and web design with a marketing spin. Feel free to comment below with questions and if you are a female entrepreneur join us for more conversation in our Brand & Convert Facebook community.

Make sure you Subscribe to the channel and turn on notifications for new videos and of course show some love by liking and commenting on the video.

Alright, let’s jump right in. So today we will be talking about Targeting the Right Persona!!!!

I’m sure you are wondering about personas that sound like a person, and yes you are right, I’m talking about people, you, me, your next-door neighbor, the cute guy at your gym, or even your grandma.

Ok, maybe not your grandma, but who knows maybe they are your target. So the official definition of a persona is “A target persona outlines a typical member of a target audience. They are fictional representations rooted in behavioral data and knowledge that you’ve gained from getting to know your supporters on a personal level.”

Here are three things to know about personas:

1) They are your ideal customer

a. The one that loves your products and services just as they are and is a champion of your small business. They are repeat buyers and tend to refer new customers your way.

2) You may have more than one

3) When outlining who they are go beyond why they need your services

To build an effective persona:

1. Create an identity.

2. Understand their biggest challenges.

3. Think about a day in their life for them

4. Figure out their motivations

Example: Kiara is a 49-year-old, African-American woman small business owner. She lives in Chicago, IL is recently married to a stepdaughter. She has been doing her business for the last 12 years full-time but due to the pandemic has lost most of her contracts. She is Christian and wants to rebrand her company to align more with her faith and passions so that she can survive financially without the contracts. She has an existing brand and website that she does not love.

When you’re a small business with limited time and a limited budget, you want to do everything you can to get the greatest impact from the least amount of resources. Identifying the right buyer for your product or service can help you make a big splash and get your small business noticed in a sea of multiple marketing channels and distractions. When you create your marketing strategy, you should be creating content, products, and services for those targets. You should also be crafting your brand’s look and feel to appeal to your target.

That’s it for today, thanks for watching. For more conversation about personas join my private Facebook community Brand & Convert with Adrian M White.

Also don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram at Brandwithamw for more entrepreneur advice and a look into my everyday life.

Wishing you much success and good juju

Preparing for a Brand Photoshoot

Preparing for a Brand Photoshoot

Hey guys, it’s your girl Adrian M White aka Brand with AMW and I’m here today for another weekly Brand & Convert Chat and Chew. This is your chance to take a quick snack or lunch break and learn about all things branding, marketing, and entrepreneurship. Get your notebooks out because I have some juicy content to share.

Follow me @brandwithamw on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram, and join our private Facebook Community, Brand & Convert with Adrian M White for more conversation on developing brands, websites, and processes that attract and convert more clients and grow six-figure businesses. Link in the description.

Coaches, consultants, and personal brands, do you STRUGGLE to bring in clients from social media, email, and your website (who are not friends, family, or referrals)? If so, my new live training series will help!

This Tuesday, Feb. 22nd, and Thursday, Feb. 24th at 2 PM EST I’ll be doing parts 2 and 3 of my live marketing training entitled, “Scalable Digital Marketing Tactics for the Future Six-Figure CEO.” In this training, I’ll break down how my clients have grown their businesses to six figures/year by better positioning themselves online to stand out and executing marketing plans that drive sales, engagement, and increased followers.

In addition, you’ll learn how to skyrocket to the first page of Google and how to automate your sales processes so you can book more calls and fill up your calendar, while you sleep. If you’re looking for the next right step to take so you can experience real progress in growing your business, simply go to https://training.brandwithamw.com to register today!

Are you currently promoting yourself online to in turn promote your business? Put yourself out there and make a statement to your followers by copping your exclusive ‘I Am My Brand’ swag. I’m currently wearing the woman’s V-neck t-shirt in black. T-shirts are available in black and white with male and female sizing, available in sizes S-2X for $25 each. Get yours today at brandwithamw.com/shop.

And finally, make sure you Subscribe to the channel and turn on notifications for new videos, and of course show some love by liking and commenting on the video.

Are you thinking about giving your brand a refresh with some new photos? If you are anything like me, I waited almost 3 years to do my most recent brand photoshoot because I was waiting to lose 20lbs or for my hair to grow longer after a cut. The problem is, you still need to promote your business, and having professional brand photos will help and that’s what we’ll be discussing today, “Preparing for a Brand Photoshoot.”

So let’s start by talking about what a brand photoshoot is. A brand photoshoot is a photoshoot that’s centered around your brand. A brand photoshoot is a pre-planned photo shoot where we’re determining the purpose of the images. We’re asking how to bring the brand to life, and how we want people to feel and perceive the brand based on those images. Planned weeks before the shoot even occurs, a brand photoshoot takes into consideration the location, props, outfits, shots, and angles to ensure that every image captured is designed to spark emotion and sell.

Here are 5 tips to prepare for your brand photoshoot:

1) Establish your brand colors

2) Bring props

3) Get your hair and makeup professionally done

4) Think of locations that match your brand color scheme

5) Show some personality

If you have questions on how to prepare for a brand photoshoot feel free to comment on this video and I’ll be sure to respond. Or if you need branding, web design, or marketing coaching help, feel free to book a complimentary brand strategy session with me at uniquebrandsthatconvert.com.

Also don’t forget to register for my free 3-part live training, “Scalable Digital Marketing Tactics for the Future Six-Figure CEO” today at https://training.brandwithamw.com.

Comment below with any questions and join me this Friday at 1 PM EST in our private Facebook Community for Friday Lives. This is where you can participate in a live discussion on this week’s topic and Q&A. Don’t forget to follow me on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram at Brandwithamw for more entrepreneur advice and a look into my everyday life.

Wishing you much success and good juju.